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retailers that have closed down. >> based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-90s to sell books online and forears made no profit, but it soon became clear that the founder and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though he declined our request for an interview, he recently told fortune magazine -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. we like tofia find, is there someone out there doing some element better than we, and if so, how do we improve? >> while that may be good news for millions of consumers who enjoy amazon's low prices, it is daunting for many businesses. even those that call amazon a partner. >> it's a wolf in sheep's clothing, is probably a better way to describe it. >> this woman is a retail analyst at forests research, and she said amazon has a pattern. find a company with a good pro
-- for republicans calling from seattle, washington. caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. summers, you exhibit the knowledge that is rarely seen on the "washington journal" about things of this nature. one senators set to another senator, we should just go over the -- 1 senator said to another senator, we should just go over the cliff. i do not know if people would be happy if they paid attention to her little conference. i appreciate your knowledge of sequestration. guest: thank you so much for your call. i actually spoke to senator patty murray. she said, let's just go over the cliff and see what happens. we have been calling them the cliff jumpers. she said to me, if there is not some kind of fix -- see is optimistic there would be one -- that would be detrimental for washington and outside of the seattle area. that is a concern i am hearing from her and other representatives from the states of washington. despite the rhetoric that sometimes goes on on capitol hill, that is something she is concerned about. she recognizes how important that is. that is what i got out of my conversation with
don't know why, i mean, i should have moved back to seattle, washington to my family. it never entered my mind. i was 29 years old. i had the cutest kids on earth. here's a side story, men would say they like me. i was pretty. you have three children? where do they live? i would say they live with me, you jerk. where do you think they live, they are my children. no, i was always an activist. i was always an activist, always a leader. it never entered my mind that we weren't going to get through this. but i was educated. i had good job skills. i was articulate and you know i had a lot of spine. i wasn't afraid for asking what was due. i was outspoken, that is a better word to say. i was healthy and my children were healthy. a lot of welfare recipients they aren't any of that. i would say to my friends i don't know how these other women do this that don't have the advantages that i have? they would look at me like what do you care about these other women you are struggling. i cared. that's what i brought with me. i was an executive at an electronics company and on the city council and he
. both d.c. and seattle. >> clayton: and some of those investments, even in the d.c. area, we saw some investments in the outlying areas, but phoenix of course, vegas. investors coming in and buying up a lot of those properties down there, but how will the fiscal cliff affect investment going forward and maybe helping this recovery? because we're going to see a big increase in the capital gains taxes? >> that's right, it's going to have a bigger impact than i think analysts are predicting, maybe because they're numbers crunchers and not in the market. and fueling the momentum in the real estate markets, snapping up the foreclosure properties the last few years and the concern is they're going to be a little bit more conservative in their purchasing moving forward. and here is a really big thing to consider. consumer confidence is a huge driver in housing. and with this, all of this uncertainty of how much tax, people are going to be paying and what types of tax hikes people are going to be experiencing next year, i think the quarter one is it going to be a very conservative quarter for
are in seattle. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. fixed exchange rates. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, what you had was unsustainable debts coming irresponsible banking -- unsustainable that's, irresponsible banking. you had the collapse of the currency. it is what we have not now in greece, exactly the same. the generation that came to power in 1932 were exceptionally fearful of what would happen to the united states of america after 1944. because they very much fear
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5